Elton John is encouraging his boys to pursue their own passions in life.

As the family attended the unveiling of Saks Fifth Avenue’s holiday windows in New York City on Wednesday, the Grammy Award winner, who is 75 years old, was asked by E! News whether his and David Furnish’s sons Zachary Jackson, 1112, and Elijah Joseph, 912 years old, have any interest in music. Zachary Jackson is the older of the two boys.

John expressed his uncertainty by stating, “They are still so young, so not quite sure.” “But of course, no matter what their goals and aspirations may be, my husband David and I will always be there to give them our unwavering support.”

After successfully bringing Zachary and Elijah into the world via surrogacy, he and Furnish, who was 60 at the time, tied the wedding in 2014, which marked the 9th anniversary of their civil partnership.

When John played the last gig of the North American leg of his Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles over the weekend, he invited his family to join him on stage. This was the final show of the Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour. He said so in a kind and endearing manner, citing his brood as the reason for his retirement.

According to John’s comments to E! News, “I am certainly looking forward to the opportunity to spend more time with my boys.” “I am also looking forward to the opportunity to devote more of my time to other organizations, such as the Elton John AIDS Foundation,” she said.

During his 75th birthday celebration in March, the musician best known for Goodbye Yellow Brick Road addressed a heartfelt letter to his grandsons Zachary and Elijah.

When John wrote to his two children, he told them, “You are now 11 and 9 years old, and when I was your age, I could never have envisioned where life would lead me.” “When I think back over the previous seventy-five years, there is a lot that I have accomplished and a lot that I have learned.

“When I was younger, I was always being pressured to conform and to act in a way that met the expectations of others, even if I didn’t think it was the correct thing to do. I’ve come to the conclusion that I can only be myself. Being authentic to who I am is what enabled me to find my voice and overcame some of my deepest inhibitions.

John continued by saying, “Whoever you grow up to be, just be you; just be you whole and totally.”

By Elen

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